Andrew Gold (interviewed by Robert Pally)

  Andrew Gold

From making an album with Children-Songs to The Fraternal Order Of The All it is quite a long way. How much humor / irony is in your Children-Songs and how serious are your Fraternal Order Of The All songs?
AG: I actually have the same amount of irony, humour and seriousness in all the albums I make. OK, ok…maybe in the kids albums a bit more. And in my 60’s thing some of it was slightly camp…

When have you discovered humor and irony? To me your early material always sounded very nice, but also a kind of serious. I just remember "Thank you for being a friend", "Lonely Boy", "Hope you feel good", "Make up your mind" or "Always for you"
AG: I find most of my old stuff somewhat funny, but not because I meant it. However, there are in jokes in Thank You For Being A friend….but I can’t say what it is….

How did you come up with the idea to The Fraternal Order Of The All?
AG: I just love the 60’s musically, especially my favorite acts, Beatles, Beach Boys, Byrds, Simon & Garfunkel, Buffalo Springfield, Bob Dylan, Motown, Burt Bacharach, etc etc…But hearing the XTC fake group (The DUKES OF STRATOSPHEARE) was a big influence.

The Fraternal Order Of The All reminds me on albums the Turtles (Battle of the Bands), Dukes of the Stratospheare or 10 CC did. Were they an influence?
AG: See above.

On some Songs on Greetings from Planet Love I can hear which band you are faking. The Beach Boys are very obvious, the Doors, Beatles, Tom Petty/Byrds or Bob Dylan. Who else is there?
AG: Those are the main ones. There are some songs that aren’t particularly any one group but just a 60’s sound….

Since you reproduce the Beach Boys on "Greetings from Planet Love" how would your "Pet Sounds" sound like?
AG: Like Pet Sounds!

How far are you with your All-Covers-Album?
AG: About 11 songs.

On what other projects are working at the moment?
AG: Did a SUGARBEATS xmas album for kids this summer. It’ll be out during this XMAS, obviously.

You write songs for other people. How much differently do you approach them compared to the songs you write for yourself?
AG: In my songs I don’t necessarily try to be commercial. Not that trying to be commercial really helps, usually.

What do you have against todays radio?
AG: Too much formatting: I liked the old days when pop stations were almost any type of music at once. Also I hate the tiny playlist. Also, I absolutely hate that they don’t announce what song they just played. Plus, I’m not a huge fan of the music of the boy bands and rap songs etc… it’s boring to me.

What is/was challenging for you as a session musician?
AG: Trying to play what the artist wants. And in tune, with a good sound, and as quickly as possible after hearing the song for the first time.

How much different do you write songs today compared to the 70’s?
AG: I use computers more. But other than that it’s the same. I make up the songs… sometimes it goes well. Sometimes it’s hard.

You wrote your first song at 13. How did it sound? Has it ever appeared on a record?
AG: Uh, no. It is cute, but it wasn’t much good.

Was there any special incidents that made you start making music?
AG: The Beatles.

Is there something (musically) that you always wanted to do but so far have not done?
AG: A retro Brazillian album. I have a few songs put together…so one day I will.

 

Thanks to Robert Pally for providing this interview.

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